Vexing Lyrically Some More

10 02 2015

I’m not really big on philosophy. Sure, I’ve had my run of it when I was younger. Attempting to define the universe and feeling quite grand about it. It’s not that I think philosophy is not important; on the contrary, I feel that these attempts are a strong force in driving us forward. But these days I also tend to adhere more to the Mel Brooks Perspective 😛

With that out of the way; let’s disseminate some more on my idea of games. And digital games in specific. In which I attempt to derive my understanding of a what game is by mostly trying to figure out what lots of things which are not games are.

I’ve already introduced a category for scientific experiments; which are clearly not games (especially the blow-up-in-you-face-and-two-city-blocks kind of experiments). Science attempts to answer questions by simulation of conditions. Games also provide an underlying simulation in order to provide interaction – interaction being a most important part of games. But this alone is not enough.

Let’s go on another tangent (because, why not?)

Flying an airplane, be it a fighter jet or a commercial one, is no joke. And definitely not a game for the pilots who are responsible for many many lives. And yet. And yet flight simulators exist. Are all flight simulators games? That’s an interesting question. Do we treat all flight simulators as games?

The first and probably biggest difference to notice between flight simulation games and real life is the absence of actual responsibility/personal danger. These games provide a safe environment to participate in an experience which is usually not available to their players; another element, escapism of a sort (or fantasy).

So to iterate; as their name imply, simulators have at their core the concept of simulation. But as we’ve seen before, simulation is not enough to make a game. What other elements are provided by simulators. Abstraction. Fantasy. Safe.

There are, of course, further elements which can make simulators better at being games. And as the simulation level increases I suspect that the “game-ness” of the product decreases. I wonder if realism is somehow a force working in opposition to gamism.

Well, more on that later. Real life is in the way again.

I was walking through the counters of a national concern, and a cash machine was spitting by my shoulder

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